My Favorite Problem Child

Three years ago, I had a little spitfire that entered into my sixth-grade class, and she was a teacher’s worst nightmare. Amelia had an infectious smile that was somewhat crooked in nature, for it veered off at awkward angles. When she was about to be naughty, her eyes would gleam, and she would give that crooked little smile. It was like a beacon to those around her that Amelia was about to rock someone’s world, and not for the better. That glimmer in her eye warned others to take a step or two in the opposite direction because one never quite knew what she was going to do next. Continue reading “My Favorite Problem Child”

Amelia Mary Earhart: Flying Solo

One family member who found herself in a sticky situation was Amelia Mary Earhart. As one of the leading pioneers for women aviators, she disappeared on a global flight on July 2, 1937. Although many searched for her, she was never found.

Amelia Mary Earhart was born on July 24, 1897 in Atchison, Kansas to Samuel “Edwin” Staton Earhart and Amelia “Amy” Otis Earhart. Amelia and her younger sister, Grace, were tomboys who liked to play and explore the neighborhood. They would catch bugs, climb trees, and they enjoyed racing on sleds in the winter. Continue reading “Amelia Mary Earhart: Flying Solo”

Number, Please

The distant ringing of the phone brought her out of her slumber. She rubbed the sleep from her eyes and slowly sat up in her bed. Yawning, she looked at the bedside clock. It was almost time to get up anyway. She reached over, picked up the alarm clock and switched it to off. It was probably someone calling for the donut shop again. The two phone numbers were so annoyingly similar, and she received calls from the shop more times than she could count. She made her way to the kitchen to start her coffee. Just as the coffee began to perk, the phone rang again. She grabbed her notepad and pen. She said hello, and the guy on the other end asked, “Is this the donut shop?” Continue reading “Number, Please”