God’s Grace

As a child, my family met the kindest couple, Reverend and Mrs. Deacon. They were an older couple that just loved people in their church and their community. The husband and wife met my mom after my brother, David, decided to streak through the neighborhood one afternoon while riding a friend’s tractor. Soon after that crazy account, we were faithfully attending Sunday School at the Nazarene Church in Alameda, California.

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In Reference to her Children

I had eight birds hatcht in one nest,
Four Cocks were there, and Hens the rest.
I nurst them up with pain and care,
No cost nor labour did I spare
Till at the last they felt their wing,
Mounted the Trees and learned to sing.
-Anne Bradstreet

My 8x great grandmother, Anne Bradstreet, wrote poetry during the seventeenth century, and she became known as one of America’s first poets.  Although she was born in Northhampton, England, in her later years, she resided in Andover, Massachusetts.

One of her poems, In Reference to her Children, the mother and poet wrote about her her love for eight children.

Her first book of poetry, The Tenth Muse Lately Sprung up in America, was published in 1650.  It was the only book of her poetry printed in her lifetime.

Counting Sheep

My brothers saw my mother in a whole new light. She had risen to the level of a superstar, in their little eyes, for she had become a kindred spirit; she had become one with the devilish delights of all that was disgusting, and my brothers loved her all the more for her repulsive juvenile inventiveness.

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Toil and Trouble

In the days of the Salem Witch Trials, fears ran rampant as villagers worried about the dark magic of its inhabitants. Superstitions of ancient spells took flight, and many fell victim to false accusations of witchcraft. Even the animals of the region did not escape allegations, for many believed animals would aide witches with their dark craft. Many villagers would often be on the lookout for any creature that exhibited odd behavior.

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The Legacy of Susan B. Anthony

Teacher. Abolitionist. Educational Reformer. Labor Organizer. Suffragist. Women’s Rights Pioneer. Temperance Worker. Civil Rights Leader. Author.

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One of the most influential female advocates for Civil Rights was Susan B. Anthony.  Through her tireless efforts, she championed for social justice, women’s rights, and the emancipation of slaves. This remarkable woman left a lasting legacy as a heroine for justice for all people of this nation, and her historical accounts have continued to inspire people in our country.

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My Hometown Island: Alameda, California

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Sun swept beaches, glorious sunsets, fog horns sounding on cloudy mornings, and the calls of seagulls along the shores created the perfect hometown, and my childhood days passed on a perfect little island, nestled in the San Francisco Bay. Alameda had that hometown charm and the feel of a small town although Oakland and San Francisco were just miles away.

Although Alameda began as a peninsula, the powers that be decided they needed a canal to help expand the growing shipping industry. Work on this channel launched in 1874, and it was completed in 1902. Continue reading “My Hometown Island: Alameda, California”

Extra! Extra! The Latest on Joseph LaDuke

While scrolling through old newspapers for family history, I always felt as though I transported back through time. Reading about the lives of my family and their neighbors and friends have given me a sneak peek into their daily lives. It was enjoyable, a simple pleasure, and I felt a connection to my ancestors that in many ways helped me better understand their lives. Continue reading “Extra! Extra! The Latest on Joseph LaDuke”