Jeanne Fressel: A King’s Daughter in New France

After the death of her parents, my 9x great-grandmother left her French homeland behind and traveled across rough waters to make a new life in Canada. While researching this adventurous grandmother, I often wondered if she had any inkling about her new life. Although this woman knew that she was to marry once she reached her destination, did she worry about her future mate? Did she wonder about the life they would share? Did she fear the unknown frontier? Continue reading “Jeanne Fressel: A King’s Daughter in New France”

Crossing the River

One of my favorite old-time photos shows my great, great grandfather, William Strassburg, crossing a river on a wagon with a pair of horses. No name or date appears on the back. However, I know my grandfather lived in Gunnison, Colorado for many years, and the scenery does resemble the Western Slope of Colorado. The boys in the wagon are a mystery, and no one in the family knew who the children were. Continue reading “Crossing the River”

Looking Back: A Review of 2017

Earlier this week, I read a blog from a cherished fellow blogger, Jeanne Bryan Insalaco.  On her site, Everyone Has a Story, she included a year end review of her writing experiences for 2017.  She included the information from another genealogist that invited readers to write about their discoveries.  Once I read the two blogs, I wanted to share my adventures too.  I have provided the original link from Jill Ball.




Continue reading “Looking Back: A Review of 2017”

Reeder Family Home

Today, while sorting family photos, I came across this picture. All I know about it is that my grandfather, Wilson Reeder, gave it my father, Harold Reeder. On the back of the photo, all that was written was my dad’s name. I know the picture was taken in Michigan, and I do know my family lived in Plymouth, but I am not sure where the photo was taken. Continue reading “Reeder Family Home”

Motherhood — All for Family

“How dare he! Marvayle at my weaknesse, does he?” She fumed once she fled to the safety of her room. “Men call it a weaknesse when a woman uses common sense to measure what is best for a family.”

Amidst rolling hills, Dorset, England appeared to be a tranquil village in the middle years of the seventeenth century. Sheep grazed on green landscapes, and fields of flax and hemp blew softly along the countryside. Fisherman journeyed to open waters along the Dorset Coast, looking for a day’s catch of cod. Shipbuilders created vessels to use on the open seas. Around the village, production took place as crafters made rope and cloth. Still, uncertainty bubbled about this small community. As religious arguments emerged between churchgoers, villagers longed to escape religious doctrine. Others desired new lands as the hamlet’s population increased, and as crops failed, for now, work was hard to find. Continue reading “Motherhood — All for Family”

My Daughter, My Blessing

As I considered my blessings, my family always comes to my mind, especially when I think about my daughter, Leslie.  My girl has forever maintained an amazing spirit and such a loving heart.  She has always tried to help those around her, and she sometimes has taken on too much extra work because she often forgets that “no” is part of her vocabulary. Continue reading “My Daughter, My Blessing”

The Haunting of Salem

Photo by Malgorzata Frej on Unsplash

In the cold of winter, a darkness spread through the town of Salem, Massachusetts. The people of this village were haunted by the fears of the unknown. Whispered worries about a force of evil from the realms of hell created a mass hysteria that flowed through the town and caused panic, discord, and even murder, for a civilized people truly believed that witches walked among them, and they believed these spirits came to cause them harm. Continue reading “The Haunting of Salem”