Rest in Peace Grandma Rebecca: When Research Goes Awry

Recent DNA showed that I was “barking up the wrong tree.”   

Well, it was true; I must admit that I have made mistakes when it comes to my family tree.  In the beginning, when I first started on Ancestry.com, I would just click away, swinging from one family branch to the next.  As my family tree grew, I became zealous and excited.  Stories and histories swirled around in my head as I tried to piece and organize all the family details that I had discovered.  Finally, I knew I had to start writing these stories down, so they would not become lost, and so I would not confuse all the data that my research revealed.

With writing, came responsibility, so at this point, my research became more consuming.  For each person discovered, I needed back up.  I delved into internet research, and I read books—lots and lots of books.  And to the mix, I added DNA support, which has been a blessing and a curse.  Currently, in my tree, I have found 19 DNA family circles, and I have also uncovered cousins that have also connected with other family members here and there.

But then came the latest DNA relatives…in the new ancestry discoveries section…15 people in all, and I have no flippin clue how we were supposed to be related.  Although I have tried to find “the missing link,” I haven’t had any luck just yet.  With the latest bunch of info, my head began to ache, and that old country western song, Who’s Cheatin Who? by Alan Jackson started playing in my head when I tried to sort out all that nonsense.  So I have left all that for another day.

 

 

Recently, I found that I am NOT related to Rebecca Saffer, my 3x great grandmother from my story, “Wedding Bells.”  Recent DNA showed that I was “barking up the wrong tree.”   But in my defense, do you know how many William Franklin Bryants lived in Illinois during the 19th century?  Was William Franklin a popular boy’s name?  Or maybe he had multiple families in different cities…  Perhaps William Franklin is “the missing link” to all those unidentified family members.  Hmmm??!!  Okay, so I will reign in my vivid imagination before it runs amuck and return to Great Grandma Rebecca.

Sigh!  My high-spirited grandmother who married numerous times, my vivacious grandmother who married a much younger man wasn’t really mine after all.  Sadly, I have mourned this lost grandmother, for I felt a connecting spirit to a strong-willed woman as she defied the conventional norms of her day.  This grandma had moxie and raised eyebrows. With that said, she would have fit right in with the other nuts in my tree!   So, Grandmother Rebecca, I have kept you tucked in my heart.  Who knows, with all the William Franklins, maybe we could connect once again, somewhere along the way, and we can’t forget about all those wonderful new discoveries.  Maybe those “missing links” could lead us back together after all!  Until then, Grandma Rebecca, until then…

 

Photo by Anne Edgar on Unsplash

10 thoughts on “Rest in Peace Grandma Rebecca: When Research Goes Awry

    1. This adventure has been rewarding. I have to admit though it can be frustrating too, especially when we hit brick walls. And even though I will miss my “Grandma Rebecca” and all her sassy ways, I am glad the DNA placed me back where I need to be. Thank you kiddo for stopping by!

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Your post today reminds me of this:
    “One of the greatest tragedies of life is the murder of a beautiful theory by a gang of brutal facts.”
    – Benjamin Franklin
    I have so many times in my research followed what I call the wrong “rabbit’s trail”, and then having to redo so much work. I hope the DNA gives you many good trails to follow and your tree grows and grows.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Hello, I see that youare related to Enoch Enocks..Is that correct. I too have had my DNA tested and it shows that I may be a distant relative to Enoch Enochs as well

    Liked by 1 person

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